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1 Although colours have always been very much present in everyday life, they have also been socially, religiously, politically and symbolically encoded. In the same manner, sculptures have been modelled since time immemorial, reproducing shapes and colours according to specific social and aesthetic rules and canons. In England, this was true until the early modern era when, under King Henry VIII, state-sponsored iconoclasm began to affect parish churches, and when, under his successor Edward VI, most religious pictures were either defaced or whitewashed. Unsurprisingly, the statues still authorised under Elizabeth’s reign were strictly controlled. As recently pointed out by the “Art Under Attack” exhibition at the Tate Britain (2 October 2013 – 5 January 2014), the Protestant Reformation generally condemned the use of pictures (also referred to as ‘images’) 1 and statues in places of worship, and they had to be as plain as possible in order to be accepted, if not encouraged, by the authorities. As a consequence, a wide number of sculptures turned pale and became undecorated, unadorned, unpainted effigies (Frere and Kennedy vol. 3, passim ). Yet, in The Winter’s Tale (1611), Shakespeare chose to chisel his plot around Hermione’s painted statue – a statue which turns out to be part and parcel of the happy family reunion at the end of the play. Similarly, in Romeo and Juliet (1595) the final scene confronts the spectator with statuesque stillness where the title parts are first depicted with hues of certain colours, to be finally immortalized in the erection of statues representing the star-crossed lovers. So, this article aims at presenting an analysis of the subtle meaning(s) of colours in early modern England. Were the colour schemes and codes then settled once and for all, or were they fluctuating? Did colours stand for precise symbolical meanings? Last but not least, might the use of colours in Romeo and Juliet and The Winter’s Tale suggest something of a transition taking place in the approach to early modern sculpture?
2 See, too, Pastoureau 1994, t. 4, 27-46. 3 Thanks to new techniques coming mainly from the Continent, for instance the use of egg tempera or (. ) 4 Men of science were also conducting experiments on colours so as to understand and classify them, (. ) 5 As colours were associated with social status and / or beliefs, they were forbidden to some social (. )
2 In his article entitled “ La Reforme de la couleur ”, Michel Pastoureau asserts that for a long time, the history of colours had been more or less at rest in the West, i.e. had gone on without much variation (1992, 323-42). 2 However, he observes that, from the mid-15 th to the mid-16 th century, a phase of acceleration and a period of profound change – technical, 3 aesthetic, scientific 4 and symbolic 5 – did take place. From a religious point of view, colours in early modern England were at the heart of the theological concerns of most educated churchgoers, influenced as they were by the values of the Protestant Reformation. For the vast majority of Reformers, there were honest and dishonest colours. For instance, Martin Luther did tolerate some colours as long as they were rather pale, or if they were in accordance with the faith. As a matter of fact, the Luther Rose, also known as the Luther Seal, perfectly encapsulates Luther’s faith and its shades are highly significant. In a letter to Lazarus Spengler (1479-1534) in July 1530, Luther interprets the colours on his seal as follows:
Grace and peace from the Lord. As you desire to know whether my painted seal, which you sent to me, has hit the mark, I shall answer most amiably and tell you my original thoughts and reason about why my seal is a symbol of my theology.
The first should be a black cross in a heart, which retains its natural color, so that I myself would be reminded that faith in the Crucified saves us. “For one who believes from the heart will be justified” (Rom. 10:10). Although it is indeed a black cross, which mortifies and which should also cause pain, it leaves the heart in its natural color. It does not corrupt nature, that is, it does not kill but keeps alive. “The just shall live by faith” (Rom. 1:17) but by faith in the crucified.
Such a heart should stand in the middle of a white rose, to show that faith gives joy, comfort, and peace. In other words, it places the believer into a white, joyous rose, for this faith does not give peace and joy like the world gives (John 14:27). That is why the rose should be white and not red, for white is the color of the spirits and the angels (cf. Matt. 28:3; John 20:12).
Such a rose should stand in a sky-blue field, symbolizing that such joy in spirit and faith is a beginning of the heavenly future joy, which begins already, but is grasped in hope, not yet revealed.
And around this field is a golden ring, symbolizing that such blessedness in Heaven lasts forever and has no end. Such blessedness is exquisite, beyond all joy and goods, just as gold is the most valuable, most precious and best metal.
This is my compendium theologiae [summary of theology]. I have wanted to show it to you in good friendship, hoping for your appreciation. May Christ, our beloved Lord, be with your spirit until the life hereafter. Amen. (Luther 49: 356-59)

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